Curry rice salad

Curry rice salad

This salad is so delicious.  The bright colours and flavours of tart and sweet cranberries, crunchy carrots, tangy red onion and spring onion, fresh parsley, nutty roasted almonds and creamy curry dressing marry together to create a salad that is sure to invite compliments whenever it is served.
It can be made the day before and keeps well in the fridge for several days.

1 cup uncooked rice (or couscous or quinoa)
1/2 cup carrots, peeled and chopped
1/2 cup parsley finely chopped
1/2 cup dried cranberries (or currants)
1/4 cup roasted slivered almonds
2 spring onions finely sliced
1/4 cup finely diced red onion

Dressing Ingredients:
1/4 cup plain yoghurt
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tsp white wine vinegar
1 tsp curry powder
1/4 tsp turmeric
1/2 tsp each salt and pepper (or to taste)

1. Cook rice (or couscous or quinoa, I’ve used both successfully) as per instructions.  Let cool and then chill in the fridge.
2.  Combine chilled rice with carrots, parsley, cranberries, almonds, spring onions and red onion.
3.  Combine dressing ingredients and pour over salad.
4.  Stir gently to combine dressing with salad.  Chill before serving.

Cookbook scribbles:
This recipe is easy to double or triple and keeps well in the fridge for several days.
It is also an easy recipe to adjust according to your own taste and preference.
As the recipe states, you can use rice, quinoa or couscous (couscous is not gluten free) and it works well with any of these.  I sometimes like to add extra dressing.

Raw Kale Salad | Recipe

Raw Kale Salad | Recipe

This Kale Salad is so delicious.  My Dad brought the recipe back from friends in Canada and I have tweaked the recipe to make it my own.

If you haven’t tried Kale before, or if you’ve tried Kale but haven’t enjoyed it, I would urge you to give this recipe a try.

The Kale leaves go from being tough and fibrous, to tender and delicious once the olive oil is added. In fact this Salad is better made the day before to allow the flavours to develop and the Kale to soften beautifully. I like to make this Kale Salad the night before, usually late in the evening as the house begins to quieten down but it can be made in the morning or even just several hours before serving. Since we discovered how yummy the leftovers are the day after, I’ve been making this salad the day before.

Remove the leaves from the tough fibrous stems.  Discard the stems.

Chop the leaves in slices.  I like to slice them about 5mm-10mm wide.  It does not need to be finely shredded.

Pour the olive oil over the sliced Kale.  The amount of olive oil you need with depend on the type of Kale used.

Gently mix until all the leaves are coated with all and look shiny and glossy.  If you need to add more oil go ahead.  The leave should be fully coated but there should not be oil pooling at the bottom of the bowl.  Squeeze the lemon over the leaves and mix again.  There is no need to massage the Kale to soften it as it will begin to soften on it’s own.


In a food processor place the parmesan cheese, roasted almonds, lemon rind, garlic cloves and salt.


Pulse until the mixture looks like coarse breadcrumbs (or see recipe below for Thermomix instructions).


Sprinkle the crumb mixture over the salad and toss gently to combine.  Place olives over the salad.  Refrigerate for several hours or overnight before serving.

I love leftovers for lunch so usually make extra salad to ensure we have lunches sorted for a few days.  It’s delicious served with grilled cajun chicken or any grilled meat.


1 large bunch of Kale
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 whole lemon
4 cloves garlic
100g Parmesan cheese
100g roasted almonds
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup Kalamata Olives


Wash Kale and remove the fibrous stems.

Slice the leaves. I slice mine about 5-10mm wide. You don’t want to slice too finely, it should look rustic.

In a food processor (I use a Thermomix) place the Parmesan cheese (chopped in 1.5cm chunks), the roasted almonds, the 4 cloves of garlic (adjust to taste, sometimes I use more garlic), the lemon zest (I simply peel the rind using a peeler) and the salt.

Pulse until the mixture looks like coarse breadcrumbs.

In the Thermomix I mill for 5 seconds on speed 9, give the bowl a good shake around and then mill for a further 2 seconds on speed 9.

Pour olive oil over the sliced Kale. Gently toss the Kale until each slice is coated with oil. You may need to add more olive oil, it depends on how large your bunch of Kale is. You want the leaves to be coated with oil so they become shiny and glossy. There should not be any oil pooling in the bottom of the bowl.

Squeeze over the lemon juice and mix gently.

Sprinkle the processed mixture over the Kale and gently mix until the Kale is coated.

Place olives over the salad.

Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.  This salad will keep in the fridge for several days.

Nut free: to make this salad nut free simply replace the almonds with toasted breadcrumbs. The original recipe uses toasted breadcrumbs but I swapped these out in favour of toasted almonds to make the recipe gluten free and low carb.
In the nut free version I would simply sprinkle 1/2 cup – 1 cup of toasted almonds over the salad along with grated parmesan, salt, lemon zest and crushed garlic.  Toss gently to combine.  The breadcrumbs will sort of melt into the olive oil.

Especially delicious served with grilled meats and other salads, this Kale Salad is the perfect dish to serve at a BBQ or any shared meal over summer.

I usually buy curly Kale but I couldn’t find any at my local supermarket so we harvested our own Kale which is Russian Red Kale, a variety I haven’t grown or eaten before! It was much softer than the curly Kale.

Baby Kale leaves can also be used, just strip the leaves from the stems and slice or tear into small pieces.

Pepper Mushroom Masala

Pepper Mushroom Masala
Growing up in the southern most part of India, I had only heard of edible mushrooms in storybooks and seen them  in picture books. The ones that appeared out of nowhere during rainy season in my hometown were usually very tiny. We were warned not to touch them as they were poisonous and so we never did .
By the time I was in college, my family had moved to a town that was dry for the major part of the year and mushrooms were rarely seen around.
The University Of Agriculture which was situated in a village nearby was conducting an one day training course for growing Oyster Mushroom in homes. They were promoting it as a small business idea for small scale farmers.
My mom’s friend and our neighbor (whom we lovingly called Lawyer aunty because her husband was a Lawyer), is a science teacher and she wanted to go and learn the process of growing mushrooms for profit at home. She wanted company and asked me if I wanted to go, when my mom couldn’t get leave from work. I tagged along with her because I could skip college .
I must confess that although I went there without expecting much, I came away very fascinated by what we learnt there.
Along with the training on how to grow mushrooms at home, each participant was given a little booklet with detailed instructions of all that we learnt there and some recipes plus a bottle of spawn.
I promptly got to work. All the stars aligned. Amma let me use the little shed outside our home. Since it was harvest season, there was plenty of hay from our paddy fields which  I used to sow the sample spawn I got at the University, to grow my very first batch of mushrooms .
pepper mushroom masala-2
I was so thrilled when those pristine white oyster mushrooms appeared on the little hay bundles I had prepared for the mushrooms to grow! For you see, the green thumb thing completely skipped me even though I was born into a family of agriculturists.
After a bountiful harvest we didn’t know how to cook the mushrooms so we gave some to friends and neighbours and Amma added them to the curries she made.
One day, I decided to try a recipe from the little booklet we got at the University. The recipe was rather simple but quite tasty! And quickly became a regular in our home. DSC_0474Later, I found out that our farm help on my dad’s farm also used this same recipe to cook wild mushrooms. The only spices used here in this recipe are pepper and cumin.
The original recipe used Oyster Mushrooms, but I’ve substituted button mushrooms and the taste does not differ muchDSC_0008


250 gms Mushroom (chopped )
1 tsp pepper
1 Onion (chopped)
1 small tomato
1 tsp grated coconut (optional)
1/4 tsp cumin
1/4 tsp mustard
1 tbsp chopped coriander leaves
Curry leaves, salt to taste


Heat oil in a skillet.

Add Cumin, curry leaves and mustard seeds. Let it splutter.

Add Chopped onions, cook till they are pink in color.

Then add the tomato pieces. Saute well till mushy.

Add salt and pepper.

Now add the Mushroom. Saute well.

Sprinkle a little water. Cover and let it cook.

Add chopped corriander leaves.

Cook till the mushrooms are soft and well cooked but still firm .

Sprinkle grated coconut.

Serve as a side dish for rice.

Cook book scribbles: Without the coconut, this masala can also be used as a sandwich filler.



Roasted Beet Hummus

Beetroot Hummus is one dish that brings with it memories of eating at our favourite Turkish restaurant, giving us a chance to have a taste of the beautiful flavours of middle eastern street food of Kuwait right here at home in Christchurch.
Stored in an airtight container, it stays fresh for several days in the fridge.  Beetroot hummus tastes great with fresh cut cucumbers, carrots or crackers, pita bread or pita chips making it the perfect mid morning to late evening snack. What’s more, its so easy to make. The only timetaking process is the roasting of the beets.
Roasted Beet  Hummus
Ingredients to serve 4
3 large cloves of garlic
2 x 400g tins of chickpeas
2 tbsp lemon juice
2 1/2 tbsp tahini (sesame paste , available in supermarkets)
salt to taste
fresh black pepper to taste.
½ tsp  ground cumin powder
1 medium beetroot.
1 small green chilli
4 tablespoons of olive oil
Peel the skin of the beetroot, chop into big chunks . Preheat oven to 200 degrees C
Wrap the beetroot chunks in aluminum foil and roast them until soft and tender, takes about half an hour to an hour in my oven. When done, remove and let it cool.

Drain chick peas and rinse well. Keep aside. Peel garlic.

In a blender, add the cooled down beet, chickpeas, and garlic. Blend into a paste.
Add tahini, cumin powder, lemon juice and salt to taste. Blend till hummus is smooth and creamy like a dip.  Add pepper and drizzle olive oil over it. Serve with pita, or with veggies.
Cookbook Scribbles :
Add water only if necessary.
Taste and adjust the seasonings as you like.
In a pinch I have also used precooked beets.
If its too much work roasting the beets, skip and just blend the other ingredients and you still have a yummy hummus dip😉
MLLA is an ongoing, monthly event since 2008, in which, bloggers from any country or cuisine can take part in this event by presenting their vegetarian legume recipes. This event was created and started by Susan of The well seasoned Cook in 2008 and has been hosted by Lisa of Lisa’s kitchen since February 2013.